Glossary

The term HKD is the currency abbreviation or currency symbol for the Hong Kong dollar (HKD), the currency for Hong Kong. The Hong Kong dollar is made up of 100 cents and if often presented with the symbol $ or HK$.

 

The ISO 4217 currency code for the Czech koruna, the official legal tender for the Czech Republic. The Czech koruna (CZK) has been the official currency of the Republic since February 8, 1993, when it replaced the Czechoslovak koruna. The Republic planned to adopt the euro as its official currency in 2012, but opposition halted that move in 2007.

 

In currencies, this is the abbreviation for the Singapore Dollar.

 

NOK serves as the abbreviation for the Norwegian krone on foreign exchange markets. Norges Bank, the central bank of Norway, regulates the supply of the Norwegian krone through its economic policies. A total of seven series of banknotes have been issued by Norges Bank with an eighth series slated to appear in the second quarter of 2017.

 

 

The currency code for the Danish krone ("crown"), the official currency for the country of Denmark as well as the provinces of Greenland and the Faroe Islands. The Danish krone (DKK) was made the formal currency of Denmark in 1873, replacing the former Danish rigsdaler, and was tied to the gold standard.

 

 

In currencies, this is the abbreviation for the Swedish Krona.

GBP is the abbreviation for the British pound sterling, the official currency of the United Kingdom, the British Overseas Territories of South Georgia, the South Sandwich Islands and British Antarctic Territory and the U.K. crown dependencies: the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. The African country of Zimbabwe also uses the pound. The British pound is pegged to the Falkland Islands pound, Gibraltar pound, Saint Helenian pound, Jersey pound (JEP), Guernsey pound (GGP), Manx pounds, Scotland notes and Northern Ireland notes.

 

In the currency market, this is the abbreviation for the New Zealand dollar.

 

XRP is the native currency of the Ripple network. XRP are currently divisible to 6 decimal places, and the smallest unit is called a drop with 1 million drops equaling 1 XRP. There were 100 billion XRP created at Ripple's inception, with no more allowed to be created according to the protocol's rules. As such, the system was designed so XRP is an asset with decreasing available supply. Not dependent on any third party for redemption, XRP is the only currency in the Ripple network that does not entail counterparty risk, and it is the only native digital asset.

A term used by The Dow Theory author, Robert Rhea, to describe the day-to-day fluctuations in stock market prices. Rhea wrote that three simultaneous movements of stock prices occur that can be compared to tides, waves, and ripples. Rhea's book, The Dow Theory, published in 1932, suggested that speculators attempt to ride the tides and the occasional big waves, and that only reckless investors would ever attempt to profit from day-to-day price ripples. 

Bitcoin (the symbol is ₿) is a cryptocurrency and worldwide payment system. It is the first in the crypto market decentralized digital currency, as there are currently no banks which work with this crypto. Transactions for Bitcoin take place between users  directly which is called peer-to-peer network. For now the creatoe of this crypto remains unknown. 

CAD is the currency abbreviation or currency symbol for the Canadian dollar (CAD). The Canadian dollar is made up of 100 cents, and is often presented with the dollar sign as C$ to allow it to be distinguished from other currencies denominated in dollars, such as the U.S. Dollar (USD). CAD is considered to be a benchmark currency, meaning that many central banks across the globe keep Canadian dollars as a reserve currency.

AUD is the abbreviation for the Australian dollar in the currency market. Australian dollar replaced Australian pound back in 1966. 

The currency abbreviation or the currency symbol for the Japanese yen (JPY), the currency for Japan. The yen is made up of 100 sen or 1000 rin. The yen was originally introduced by the Meiji government as a measure to modernize the country economically.

It is the currency and legal tender of Switzerland and Liechtenstein; it is also legal tender in the Italian exclave Campione d'Italia.

Is a valuation method used to estimate the attractiveness of an investment opportunity. DCF analyses use future free cash flow projections and discounts them, using a required annual rate, to arrive at present value estimates. A present value estimate is then used to evaluate the potential for investment. If the value arrived at through DCF analysis is higher than the current cost of the investment, the opportunity may be a good one.

A rate of return is the gain or loss on an investment over a specified time period, expressed as a percentage of the investment’s cost. Gains on investments are defined as income received plus any capital gains realized on the sale of the investment.

 

The maturity date is the date on which the principal amount of a note, draft, acceptance bond or another debt instrument becomes due and is repaid to the investor and interest payments stop. It is also the termination or due date on which an installment loan must be paid in full.

 

A bond is a form of a fixed income investment where an investor loans money to government or corporations that in their turn borrow the funds for a certain period of time at a variable or fixed interest rate. Bonds are used by both big and medium-sized companies, municipalities, and even sovereign governments to help raise money and finance different projects. Owners of bonds are called debtholders or creditors.

An investment is an asset or item that is purchased with the hope that it will generate income or appreciate in the future. In an economic sense, an investment is the purchase of goods that are not consumed today but are used in the future to create wealth. In finance, an investment is a monetary asset purchased with the idea that the asset will provide income in the future or will later be sold at a higher price for a profit.

 

Technical analysis uses historical price and trading volume in chart format to attempt to predict the direction of securities prices and the demand for them. It does not make use of the tools of either top-down or bottom-up fundamental analysis. The entire premise of technical analysis would appear to fly in the face of the efficient markets. 

A method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices and volume. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security's intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns that can suggest future activity.

 

Capital gain is an increase in the value of a capital asset (investment or real estate) that gives it a higher worth than the purchase price. The gain is not realized until the asset is sold. A capital gain may be short-term (one year or less) or long-term (more than one year) and must be claimed on income taxes.

Free software that helps trader with the placing trades. Simply put, it trades instead of the trader. 

An option is a financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one party (the option writer) to another party (the option holder). The contract offers the buyer the right, but not the obligation, to buy (call) or sell (put) a security or other financial asset at an agreed-upon price (the strike price) during a certain period of time or on a specific date (exercise date).

 

Shares are units of ownership interest in a corporation or financial asset that provide for an equal distribution in any profits, if any are declared, in the form of dividends. The two main types of shares are common shares and preferred shares. Physical paper stock certificates have been replaced with electronic recording of stock shares, just as mutual fund shares are recorded electronically.

 

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